Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3 Homework

Biopac Student Lab Ultimate

The Biopac Student Lab ULTIMATE system provides the ultimate teaching solution and enables students to perform 18 Biopac Student Lab Guided Lessons, found in the BSL Laboratory Manual, and includes BSL PRO functionality for BSL PRO Lessons, advanced student projects, research, and to create or use additional lessons.

The ULTIMATE system includes all the features and functionality of the ADVANCED system, plus all of our most frequently used transducers and a human-safe stimulator. This system is ideal for multi-disciplinary labs where a number of different courses share the same lab equipment. The ULTIMATE System includes transducers suitable for human subjects.

The Biopac Student Lab Ultimate System Includes:  

  • MP36 Data Acquisition Unit with USB Cable, DC Adapter (110V/60Hz or 220V/50Hz) & Cord (US or Euro)
  • BSL 4 Software (Lessons and PRO)
  • Human-safe Stimulator 0-100 V - STMHUM
  • Electrode Lead Sets (2)  - SS2LB
  • Multi-Lead ECG Cable - SS29L
  • EDA (GSR) Lead - SS57LA
  • Disposable Electrodes (100/pk) - EL503
  • EDA (Isotonic Gel) Electrodes - EL507
  • Air Flow Transducer - SS11LA
  • Finger Twitch Transducer - SS61L
  • Hand Dynamometer - SS25LB
  • Blood Pressure Transducer - SS19L
  • Stethoscope - SS30L
  • Headphones - OUT1
  • Pressure Transducer - SS13L
  • Photoplethysmogram Transducer - SS4LA
  • Respiratory Effort Transducer - SS5LB
  • Temperature Transducer - SS6L
  • Pushbutton Hand Switch - SS10L
  • BSL Laboratory Manual MANBSL4 - includes introductory physiology text, guided procedure, and data analysis for BSL Lessons L01-L20
  • Searchable PDF Manuals and Tutorials (BSL PRO, Instructor’s Guide, Answer Key, etc.)
  • Abrasive Pads (10/pk) - ELPAD
  • Disposable Bacterial Filters (10/pk) - AFT1
  • Disposable Mouthpieces (10/pk) - AFT2
  • Disposable Noseclips (10/pk) - AFT3
  • Calibration Syringe - AFT6A
  • Surgical Tape - TAPE1
  • Abrasive Pads (10/pk) - ELPAD
  • Electrode Gel - GEL1
  • Colored Paper - PAPER1

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Biopace Student Lab Advance

The ADVANCED System is extremely flexible and can be used across multiple disciplines including human physiology, pharmacology, psychophysiology, exercise physiology and a great many more. This system comes with everything you need (except the computer) to conduct the most widely studied responses in 

physiology labs, including experimental measurements of ECG, EEG, EMG, EOG, EDA, Pulse, Airflow, Respiratory Effort, Lung Volume, Reaction Time and Skin Temperature. The BSL Lab Manual and onscreen guides take you through each step, including initial setup, software options, and lesson procedures.

The BSL PRO software allows you to create your own lessons (no programming required), or use the system for advanced student projects and research.

The Biopac Student Lab Advanced System includes:

  • MP36 Data Acquisition Unit with USB Cable, DC Adapter (110V/60Hz or 220V/50Hz), and Power Cord (US or Euro)
  • BSL 4 Software (Lessons and PRO)
  • 2 x Electrode Lead Sets - SS2LB
  • Disposable Electrodes (100/pk) - EL503
  • Abrasive Pads (10/pk) - ELPAD
  • Airflow Transducer - SS11LA
  • Disposable Bacterial Filters (10/pk) - AFT1
  • Disposable Mouthpieces (10/pk) - AFT2
  • Disposable Noseclips (10/pk) - AFT3
  • Calibration Syringe - AFT6A
  • Electrodermal Activity (EDA) Lead - SS57LA
  • EDA/Isotonic Gel Electrodes (100/pk)- EL507
  • Pulse Plethysmograph Transducer - SS4LA
  • Respiratory Effort Transducer - SS5LB
  • Temperature Transducer - SS6L
  • Tape - TAPE1
  • Hand Switch - SS10L
  • Headphones - OUT1
  • Colored Paper Set (for BSL Lesson 9) - PAPER1
  • BSL Laboratory Manual MANBSL4
  • Install disk includes Searchable PDF Manuals and Tutorials (BSL PRO, Instructors Guide, Answer Key, etc.)

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Biopac Student Lab Intro MP45

The Biopac Student Lab system is an integrated solution that allows students to record data from their own bodies. More than just a data recorder, Biopac Student Lab comes complete with hardware, software, and guided physiology lessons.

Biopac Student Lab revolutionizes how students learn the life sciences by eliminating complex setup tasks and letting them focus on learning the subject. Use the power of the BSL System to conduct the most widely studied responses in physiology labs.

Powerful and flexible, yet easy to use, BSL software allows students to get started right away. To run a lesson, simply select it from a menu and follow the prompts to collect good data. As your needs or budget change, you can add transducers to run more lessons. The MP45 works with existing BSL hardware, too, so this is a budget-conscious solution for adding more systems to your lab.

Dynamic experiments with students as subjects increase interest and retention. Promote student inquiry with advanced options or develop user-defined lessons and research projects. Perform analysis online or off; sophisticated algorithms provide beat-by-beat analysis of the primary physiological signals.

The BSL Intro System includes:

  • MP45 2 channel data acquisition system (USB powered)
  • BSL 4 Software (Lessons and PRO)BSL Laboratory Manual MANBSL4
  • Searchable PDF Manuals and Tutorials (BSL PRO, Instructor’s Guide, Answer Key, etc.)
  • 2 x Electrode Lead Sets - SS2LB
  • Disposable Electrodes, pack of 100- EL503
  • Headphones (monaural, wide-response) - 40HP
  • Electrode abrading pads (pack of 10)- ELPAD 

Perform the following lessons with the Intro system:

  • L01 Electromyography (EMG) I
  • L03 Electroencephalography (EEG) I
  • L04 Electroencephalography (EEG) II
  • L05 Electrocardiography (ECG) I
  • L06 Electrocardiography (ECG) II
  • L10 Electrooculography (EOG) I

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Biopac Student Lab Health Sciences MP45

The Biopac Student Lab system is an integrated solution that allows students to record data from their own bodies. More than just a data recorder, Biopac Student Lab comes complete with hardware, software, and guided physiology lessons.

Biopac Student Lab revolutionizes how students learn the life sciences by eliminating complex setup tasks and letting them focus on learning the subject. Use the power of the BSL System to conduct the most widely studied responses in physiology labs.

Powerful and flexible, yet easy to use, BSL 4 software allows students to get started right away. To run a lesson, simply select it from a menu and follow the prompts to collect good data. As your needs or budget change, you can add transducers to run more lessons. The MP45 works with existing BSL hardware, too, so this is a budget-conscious solution for adding more systems to your lab.

The Health Sciences System includes:

  • MP45 2 channel data acquisition system (USB powered)
  • BSL 4 Software (Lessons and PRO)
  • BSL Laboratory Manual MANBSL4
  • Searchable PDF Manuals and Tutorials (BSL PRO, Instructor’s Guide, Answer Key, etc.)
  • 2 x Electrode Lead Sets - SS2LB
  • Disposable Electrodes, pack of 100- EL503
  • Electrode abrading pads (pack of 10)- ELPAD
  • Headphones (monaural, wide-response) - 40HP
  • Airflow transducer- SS11LA
  • Calibration Syringe - AFT6A
  • Disposable Bacterial Filters (10/pk) - AFT1
  • Disposable Mouthpieces (10/pk) - AFT2
  • Disposable Noseclips (10/pk) - AFT3
  • Blood Pressure Cuff- SS19L
  • Stethoscope transducer- SS30L
  • Clench Force (bulb) transducer- SS56L

Perform the following lessons with this system:

  • L01 Electromyography (EMG) I
  • L02 Electromyography (EMG) II - with SS56L
  • L03 Electroencephalography (EEG) I
  • L04 Electroencephalography (EEG) II
  • L05 Electrocardiography (ECG) I
  • L06 Electrocardiography (ECG) II
  • L10 Electrooculography (EOG) I
  • L12 Pulmonary Function I -with SS11LA
  • L13 Pulmonary Function II - with SS11LA
  • L16 Blood Pressure - with SS19L
  • L17 Heart Sounds

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Biopac Student Lab Human Physiology

Use the power of the BSL System to conduct the most widely studied responses in physiology labs and perform analysis online or off. Lessons target the circulatory system, respiratory system, muscular function, brain function, ANS, exercise physiology and neurophysiology. Dynamic experiments with students as subjects increase interest and retention. Basic lessons guide and prompt students. Promote student inquiry with advanced options or develop user-defined lessons and research projects.

Features

  • 25 lessons targeted for Human Physiology
  • Add three lessons with the transducer accessory pack
  • ECG, EEG, EMG, EOG and EGG
  • Pulmonary Function FEV123, MVV, PV Loops
  • Airflow
  • Blood Pressure
  • Heart Sounds and Korotkoff Sounds
  • Nerve Conduction
  • Electrodermal Activity (GSR)
  • Pulse
  • Reaction Time
  • Temperature
  • Stimulation and Response
  • Gas Analysis (O2 and CO2)
  • Calorimetry
  • Force and Pressure
  • Cardiac Output (Bioimpedance), Stroke Volume
  • Auditory, Somatosensory and Visual Evoked Response
  • Angle of Movement
  • Acceleration

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Unformatted text preview: BIOPAC Systems, Inc. Lesson 3 ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY I EEG I Relaxation and Brain Rhythms Alpha, beta, delta, and theta rhythms lOS-EEE-l gamma: beta I delta; ! Page 2 Lesson 3: EEG I Biopac Student Lab 1. INTRODUCTION The brain is encased by the cranium, bones of the skull which immediately cover and protect brain surfaces. A thin cover of skin, called the scalp, covers most of the cranium. The largest part of the brain immediately beneath the bones of the cranium is the cerebral cortex. The cerebral cortex is composed of nerve cells (neurons), many of which are functionally connected to each other, and connected to other parts of the brain. Electrical activity in the form of nerve impulses being sent and received to and from cortical neurons is always present, even during sleep. In a biological sense (as well as a medical or legal sense), absence of electrical activity in the human cerebral cortex signifies death. Functions of the cerebral cortex include abstract thought, reasoning, voluntary and involuntary control of skeletal muscle, and the recognition and differentiation of somatic, visceral, and special sensory stimuli. Specific regions of the cerebral cortex process or generate various kinds of information. For example, the occipital lobe processes visual information while the parietal lobe processes somatosensory information such as cutaneous pain or temperature (Fig 3.1). Central sulcus Frontal lobe \_\ \ /Parietal lobe \Occipital lobe \ Cerebel lum Temporal lobe Fig 3.1 Regions of the brain The sensory information is relayed from the periphery through lower centers in the brain, and then the information is sent to various regions of the cerebral cortex. Since the cerebral cortex is just under the cranium, electrodes placed on the scalp above the various regions of the brain can detect the electrical activity associated with functioning neurons. The recording of the brain’s activity obtained by using electrodes is called electroencephalogram or EEG (electro = electrical, encephelo = brain, gram 2 record). An EEG electrode will mainly detect the activity in the brain region just under it. Nevertheless, the electrodes receive the activity from thousands of neurons. In fact, one square millimeter of cortex has more than 100,000 neurons. Since each region of the cerebral cortex of an alert person is busy receiving, integrating, and sending many impulses, this activity is detected in the EEG. (For more information about waveforms, see the Orientation chapter.) Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3: EEG I Page 3 It is only when the input to a region is synchronized with electrical activity occurring at the same time that you begin to distinguish simple, periodic waveforms in an EEG. In 1929, an Austrian physician named Hans Berger discovered that electrodes placed on the scalp could detect various patterns of electrical activity. After verifying that the recordings were indeed recording from the brain, and were not artifacts of muscle or scalp, scientists began to study these “brain waves”. Today, the EEG is still a medically useful recording for brain function. In medical and basic research, the correlation of particular brain waves with sleep phases, emotional states, psychological profiles, and types of mental activities is ongoing. Four simple periodic rhythms recorded in the EEG are alpha, beta, delta, and theta. These rhythms are identified by frequency (Hz or cycles/sec) and amplitude (Table 3.1). The amplitudes recorded by scalp electrodes are in the range of microvolts (uV or 1/ 1,000,000 of a volt). Table 3.1 Typical Frequencies and Amplitudes of Synchronized Brainwaves Note: The amplitude measurements shown in Table 3.1 are those values reported in clinical settings. In a classroom setting, the amplitudes may be ’ much lower. Alpha The four basic rhythms have been associated with various states. In general, the alpha rhythm is the prominent EEG wave pattern of an adult who is awake but relaxed with eyes closed. Each region of the brain has a characteristic alpha rhythm but alpha waves of the greatest amplitude are recorded from the occipital and parietal regions of the cerebral cortex. Results from various studies indicate that: > females tend to have higher mean frequencies of alpha waves than males > alpha wave amplitudes are likely to be higher in “outgoing” subjects > alpha wave amplitudes vary with the subject’s attention to mental tasks performed with the eyes closed In general, amplitudes of alpha waves diminish when subjects open their eyes and are attentive to external stimuli although some subjects trained in relaxation techniques can maintain high alpha amplitudes even with their eyes open. Page 4 Lesson 3: EEG I Biopac Student Lab Beta Beta rhythms occur in individuals who are alert and attentive to external stimuli or exert specific mental effort, or paradoxically, beta rhythms also occur during deep sleep, REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep when the eyes switch back and forth. Notice that the amplitude of beta rhythms tends to be lower than for alpha rhythms. This does not mean that there is less electrical activity, rather that the “positive” and “negative” activities are starting to counterbalance so that the sum of the electrical activity is less. Thus, instead of getting the wave—like synchronized pattern of alpha waves, desynchronization or alpha block occurs. So, the beta wave represents arousal of the cortex to a higher state of alertness or tension. It may also be associated with “remembering” or retrieving memories. Delta and Theta Delta and theta rhythms are low—frequency EEG patterns that increase during sleep in the normal adult. As people move from lighter to deeper stages of sleep (prior to REM sleep), the occurrence of alpha waves diminishes and is gradually replaced by the lower frequency theta and then delta rhythms. Although delta and theta rhythms are generally most prominent during sleep, there are cases when delta and theta rhythms are recorded from individuals who are awake. For example, theta waves will occur for brief intervals during emotional responses to frustrating events or situations. Delta waves may increase during difficult mental activities requiring concentration. In general, the occurrence and amplitudes of delta and theta'rhythms are highly variable within and between individuals. ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' Electrode positions Electrode positions have been named according to the brain region below that area of the scalp: frontal, central (sulcus), parietal, temporal, and occipital. In the bipolar method, the EEG is measured from a pair of scalp electrodes. The pair of electrodes measures the difference in electrical potential (voltage) between their two positions above the brain. A third electrode is put on the earlobe as a point of reference, ‘ground’, of the body’s baseline voltage due to other electrical activities within the body. In today’s lesson, you will record an EEG using the bipolar method. II. EXPERIMENTAL OBJECTIVES 1) To record an EEG from an awake, resting subject with eyes open and eyes closed. 2) To identify and examine alpha, beta, delta, and theta components of the EEG complex. Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3: EEG I Page 5 III. MATERIALS > BIOPAC electrode lead set (SS2L) > BIOPAC disposable vinyl electrodes (E1503), 3 electrodes per subject > BIOPAC electrode gel (GELl) and abrasive pad (ELPAD) 0r Skin cleanser or alcohol prep > Lycra® swim cap'(such as Speedo® brand) or supportive wrap (such as 3M Cobanw Self—adhering Support Wrap) to press electrodes against head for improved contact. > Cot or lab table and pillow > Computer system: Macintosh® — minimum 68020 or PC running Windows 95/98/NT 4.0/2000® > Memory requirements: The Biopac Student Lab application needs to have at least 4MB of RAM available for its needs. This is 4MB above and beyond the operating system needs and any other programs that are running. BIOPAC Student Lab software v3.0 or greater. BIOPAC acquisition unit (MP30) BIOPAC wall transformer (AC 100A) VVVV BIOPAC serial cable (CBLSERA) Page 6 Lesson 3: EEG I Biopac Student Lab IV. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS Overview > As you complete the Experimental Methods (Set Up, Calibration, and Recording) and the Analysis, you may need to use the following tools and/or display options. The following window display is only a reference sample -— it does not represent any lesson specific data. The sample screen shows 3 channels of data and four channel measurement boxes, but your screen display may vary between lessons and at different points within the same lesson. channel measurement boxes h 1# It II ((3 anne measuremen ype resu ) marker marker tools ml JohnB.L02 channel boxes 4 e r . A (Data analysts mode only) \\ 3 = 15595 [E]: 939947 = 0.04693 =7 1 I in Force ‘- 323lz33 PH ‘ k 1 b 1 dvertical scales mar er a e (f vertical (amplitude) scroll bar A Inlearuted E Q . ‘ . selection/fool zoom tool horizontal (time) scroll bar ; horizontal scale LBeam‘ cursor > The following symbols are used throughout Experimental Methods and Analysis, as explained below: Key to Symbols Q If you encounter a problem or need further explanation of a concept, refer to the Orientation Chapter for more details. E The data collected in the step needs to be recorded in the Data Report (in the section indicated by the alpha character). You can record the data individually by hand or choose Edit > Journal > Paste measurements to paste the data to your journal for future reference. V Most markers and labels are automatic. This symbol is used to indicate that you need to insert a marker and key in a marker label similar to the text in quotes. You can insert and label the marker during or after acquisition. On a Mac, press “ESC” and on a PC, press “F9.” Markers appear on the top of the screen as inverted triangles. > Each section is presented in a two—column format, as described below. DETAILED EXPLANATION OF STEPS This side of the lesson contains more detailed information to clarify the steps and/or concepts in the FAST TRACK, and may include reference diagrams, illustrations, and screen shots. Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3: EEG I Page 7 Detailed Explanation of Set Up Steps The desktop should appear on the monitor. If it does not appear, ask the laboratory instructor for assistance. lg.” Plugs into/Channell CH 2 CH 3 CH 4 Busy inar coo MODEL MP30 SSZL Electrode Lead Set Fig. 3.2 llll1 _. A supine position with the head resting comfortably but tilted to one side is recommended. The best recordings occur when the subject is relaxed throughout the session. Electrode adhesion to the scalp is crucial for obtaining a meaningful EEG recording. BLACK Lead (Ground) Fig. 3.3 Page 8 Lesson 3: EEG I Biopac Student Lab Hints for obtaining optimal data: a) As much as possible, move the hair away from the electrode adhesion area. Otherwise the hair will pull the electrodes up, away from the scalp. b) Apply pressure to the electrodes for about 1 minute after the initial placement. c) Subject should remain still because blinking and other movement will affect the recording of all four rhythms. d) Despite your best efforts, electrode adhesion may not be strong enough to record data; try another Subject or different electrode placement. e) Wrap the subject’s head to secure electrode placement. Guidelines for electrode placement: a) The placement of the scalp electrodes can vary (within limits) depending on your instructor’s or the Subject’s preference. b) Keep the electrodes on one side (right or left) of the head. 0) The third electrode is the ground electrode and is connected to the earlobe (position “c”). Although the adhesive collar is larger than the earlobe, it can be folded under the ear for proper adhesion. Altemately, the ground electrode can be placed on the facial skin ' behind the earlobe. ' l i 7 7 7 ' 7 The pinch connectors work like a small Clothespin, but only latch onto the nipple of the electrode from one side of the connector. Drape the electrode cables over the head so that they are not pulling on the electrodes. Place a Lycra® swim cap or supportive wrap on the Subject’s head to press the electrodes against the scalp with a constant pressure. Subject should n_ot hold electrodes against scalp. Ideally, the room should be reasonably quiet to help the subject mentally relax. This 5-minute period is also important to give the electrodes time to establish contact with the surface of the skin. Use a unique identifier. 1!! This ends the Set Up procedure. Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3: EEG I Page 9 B. CALIBRATION The Calibration procedure establishes the hardware’s internal parameters (such as gain, offset, and scaling) and is critical for optimum performance. Pay close attention to the Calibration procedure. Detailed Explanation of Steps The Calibrate button is in the upper left corner of the Setup window. A warning will come up, requesting that you check the electrode attachments one last time. This will begin the calibration procedure. The BIOPAC Student Lab will begin recording data and use it to calculate optimal settings for the subject. The calibration procedure will stop automatically after 15 seconds. At the end of the 15—sec calibration recording, your screen should resemble Fig. 3.4. =D~$ lDS-EES-l Hecardl Redo talibrationl Figure 3.4 There should be a relatively flat line (as in Fig. 3.4). If the data shows any large spikes, then you must redo calibration by clicking on the Redo Calibration button and repeating the entire calibration sequence. Page 10 Lesson 3: EEG I Biopac Student Lab C. RECORDING LESSON DATA Detailed Explanation of Steps You will record the “raw EEG” while the subject is relaxed with eyes closed, eyes opened, and eyes closed again. After recording the “raw EEG” Signal, you will then extract the four brain rhythms: alpha, beta, delta, and theta. In order to work efficiently, read this entire section before starting to record. Hints for obtaining optimal data: a) Good electrode contact is essential to minimize “noise” and increase signal amplitude. b) The subject should lie still, and especially, keep facial muscles still. c) During the “eyes open” segment, subject should not blink. d) The subject should try relaxation techniques, such as concentrating on breathing slowly or relaxing muscles. The “raw EEG” will be recorded on Channel 1. The recording should last about 30 seconds. The Director should tell the Subject to change the eye condition for 10— second intervals, and the Recorder should insert a marker at each change. To insert Markers: Mac = Esc key, PC = F9 key M First 10 seconds Subject should be relaxed, with eyes closed for the first 10 seconds (secs. 0—10). Next 10 seconds Director should tell the Subject to open the eyes and try not to blink from 10 seconds (secs. 11-20). Recorder should insert marker labeled “eyes open.” After another 10 seconds Director should tell the Subject to close his/her eyes for another 10 seconds (secs. 21—30). Recorder should insert marker labeled “eyes closed.” Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3: EEG I Page 11 If all went well, your data should look similar to Fig.3.5 and you can proceed to Step 5. LD3-EEB-l Ede-ml [owl = EI= l3= III= Fig. 3.5 If you feel you made a mistake in the recording, or there are large spikes in your data (indicating the subject may have blinked or moved) you should redo the recording. You can redo the recording by clicking on “Redo” and repeating Steps 1-3. When you click Redo, the data you have just recorded will be erased. When you click on each button, the program will compute and display the specific frequency bands. ' ' ‘ Rhythm Frequency (Hz) alpha 8-13 beta 13-30 delta 1-5 theta 4-8 Look at the alpha frequency band. Your data should look similar to Fig. 3.6, with a decrease in amplitude during the “eyes open” segment. If this is the case, proceed to Step 8. Redo I fiesta f Dune l -mml§ifl .' theta delta Fig. 3.6 Page 12 Lesson 3: EEG I Biopac Student Lab If your data does not show any change,it is possible that the electrodes were not properly attached to the skin or the recording procedure was not properly followed, and you should consider redoing the recording. You can redo the recording by clicking on “Redo” and repeating Steps 7 -8. When you click Redo, the data you have just recorded will be erased. After you press Done, a pop—up window with four options will appear. Make your choice, and continue as directed. If choosing the “Record from another subject” option: a) Attach electrodes per Set Up Step 6 and continue the entire lesson from Set Up Step 11. b) Each person will need to use a unigue file name. Remove the electrode cable pinch connectors, and peel off the electrodes. Throw out the electrodes (BIOPAC electrodes are not reusable). Wash the electrode gel residue from the skin, using soap and water. The electrodes may leave a slight ring on the skin for a few hours, which is quite normal. END OF RECORDING x49" Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3: EEG I Page 13 V. DATA ANALYSIS Detailed Explanation of Data Analysis Steps Enter the Review Saved Data mode from the Lessons menu. M The data window should be similar to Fig. 3.6 (in the Recording section). To hide a channel, click on the channel box and hold down: Mac: “option” key PC: “Ctrl” (control) key This will toggle between hiding and showing the channel’s data. The following tools help you adjust the data window: ILL!” Autoscale horizontal Horizontal(Time) Scroll Bar Autoscale waveforms Vertical (Amplitude) Scroll Bar Zoom Tool Zoom Previous The measurement boxes are above the marker region in the data window. Each measurement has three sections: channel number, measurement type, and result. The first two sections are pull-down menus that are activated when you click on them. M stddev: standard deviation is a measure of the variability of data points. The data represent amplitudes of the brain rhythms. The advantage of the stddev measurement is that extreme values or artifacts do not unduly influence the measurement. The “selected area” is the area selected by the I—Beam tool (including the endpoints). Page 14 Lesson 3: EEG I Biopac Student Lab You can record this and all measurement data individually by hand or choose Edit > Journal > Paste measurements to paste the data to your journal for future reference. The selected area (from Time 0 to the first marker) represents the data from the first “eyes closed” segment (Fig. 3.7) Marks-[03 = = III= assess EI= “HEB theta Fig. 3.7 This is the segment between the first and second marker, and represents the time when the eyes were open. This is the segment between the second marker and the end of the file, and represents the time when the eyes were re-closed. The following is a brief description of the specific measurement. L39.“ Freq: converts the time segment of the selected area to frequency in cycles/sec. It will not calculate the correct frequency if the selected area contains more than one cycle. Note: The Freq measurement applies to all channels since it is calculated from the horizontal time scale. none: turns off the measurement channel. Segment 1 is from Time 0 to the first marker. Zoom M Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3: EEG I One cycle in the alpha wave Marks-L05 \ wm‘a EI= flaflflfitmu _r-— 2 - 3 8.88566 -o.oooo 2‘015 29 I 3.502? 4.2032 seconds 51—13:: Fig. 3.8 Make sure you stay in Segment 1 data. You may save the data to a floppy drive, save notes that are END OF LESSON 3 Complete the Lesson 3 Data Report that follows. Page 16 Lesson 3: EEG I Biopac Student Lab Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3: EEG I Lesson 3 ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY I EEG I DATA REPORT Student’s Name: Lab Section: Date: L Data and Calculations Subject Profile Name Height Age Weight Gender: Male or Female A. EEG Amplitude Measurements Complete Table 3.2 with Standard Deviation measurements: Table 3.2 Standard Deviation [stdde 17 Page 18 Lesson 3: EEG I Biopac Student Lab B. EEG Frequency Measurements Complete Table 3.3 with the frequencies for each rhythm and calculate the mean frequency: Table 3.3 Frequency (Hz) Beta Delta CH 4 Theta CH 5 11. Questions C. List and define two characteristics of regular, periodic waveforms. 7 D. Compare and contrast synchrony and alpha block. E. Examine the alpha and beta waveforms for change between the “eyes closed” state and the “eyes open” state. 1. Does desynchronization of the alpha rhythm occur when the eyes are open? ii. Does the beta rhythm become more pronounced in the “eyes open” state? Biopac Student Lab Lesson 3: EEG I Page 19 F. The amplitude measurements (stddev) are indicative of how much alpha activity is occurring in the subject. But, the amplitude values for beta do not truly reflect the amount of mental activity occurring with the eyes open. Explain. G. Examine the delta and theta rhythm. Is there an increase in delta and theta activity when the eyes are open? Explain your observation. H. Define the following terms: i. Alpha rhythm ii. Beta rhythm iii. Delta rhythm iv. Theta rhythm ...
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