Countlines Chocolate Definition Essay

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English to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Food & Drink / snack, sweets
English term or phrase:difference between countline and table
Dear Colleagues,

I'm not sure I can ask such a question here, but I have nowhere else to ask. I'm stuck on this difference. My text, from a large international snack producer, is a hectic one, not much about one subject before jumping to another, but this is the text in the chocolate production context and starting with a particular brand in perspective for the US market.

"... there is a monthly call with the planning team in the US. They remain confident. The market is very different; it is more a countline than a tablet business. XXX shared that we see what is working and we are starting to adapt our plans. The business is growing and we are now starting to build our plans for 2018 so we will get a better picture on the volumes."

The client the text comes from provided me with a description (through the agency) of what they mean by countline (which I had already known) as follows: "By "countlines" they mean chocolate bars or tablets packed and sold in a pack, as opposed to sold as single items."

I may be a bit slow on the uptake, but I've been struggling for 2 days to understand why they call a difference between selling chocolate bars in a pack "very different" from selling them as single items, when in the case of chocolate bars/tablets, packaging is always there, though not in packs of 10. I haven't ever seen chocolate bars/tablets in packs of, say, 10 on a shop shelf. Before I can understand the huge importance of the difference between two packaging sizes, I can't translate them into my target language, where I'm also placing this question. Hopefully some help can arrive before my deadline expires.

Thank you for any help and have a nice day.
Peter Simon

KudoZ activity
Questions: 37 (none open)
(1 without valid answers)
(3 closed without grading)
Answers: 259


Netherlands
Local time: 06:13
Origin of term: countline sold by count/number/unit v tablet sold by weight
Explanation:
The market definition of a chocolate countline is a product that is sold by count rather than weight (like moulded bars), — a chocolate product that is bought "for me now."
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=qCZOAAAAYAAJ&dq="countli...

In the 1980s Cadbury (the predecessor of Cadbury Trebor Bassett) developed a new production process which could extrude chocolate into different shapes and textures without the use of moulds which was used to manufacture a new impulse ‘countline’ snack product. Countline is the name given to chocolate bars originally sold by number in units rather than by weight. In 2006 the overall countline market was worth around £850m (Cadbury promotional literature, 2006). The new product brief was to develop a product that would ‘build on Cadbury’s Dairy Milk heritage in a pure chocolate countline format, exploring all possible textures, configurations and resultant “eats”’ (Cadbury, 1991).
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=lqN-AgAAQBAJ&pg=PT396&lp...

• Countlines: chocolate-covered bars designed to be eaten as a snack and on the go. This includes bitesize countlines sold in multipacks. This category has an extremely wide range of brands, with many available in different sizes or multipacks to address each of the areas of consumer needs, from hunger satisfaction to indulgence. Manufacturers are constantly developing new varieties. This market segment is dominated by “Kit Kat” and “Mars” bars. Products marketed as biscuits or cookies are not included in this category;
• Tablets: solid chocolate bars, blocks or tablets shaped by pouring melted chocolate into moulds, with or without added ingredients;
http://s3.amazonaws.com/zanran_storage/www.icco.org/ContentP...

26.2 Confectionery types
26.2.1 Moulded chocolate tablets and bars
26.2.2 Chocolate countlines
The “countline” is the core of the large-scale chocolate business in many countries. It is typically an enrobed irregular shaped product in contrast to the uniform shape of a tablet. Flow wrap packaging formats dominate the countline market.
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=o1A_DgAAQBAJ&pg=PT980&lp...

The three basic categories are:
(i) Chocolate bars (which may or may not be filled). The typical product is a standard bar of say, Cadbury's or Hershey's.
(ii) Countlines (so called because they are normally sold in single units, that is, by "count" as are chocolate bars, but involve a mixture of chocolate with other ingredients). The quintessential countline is the Mars bar, but the category covers a broad range of items including light products such as chocolate-covered wafers of the Kit-Kat type.
(iii) Assortments
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=HfxcCO5msgwC&pg=PA267&dq...

Selected response from:


Alison MacG
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:13
Grading comment
Thank you and all for your help! I do miss a clear reaction to the definitions I quoted in the debate section though, which is somewhat contradictory to this.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer





Discussion entries: 15

17:48 Oct 14, 2017 



Slightly straying from the point: the chocolate at the checkout is there to encourage both impulse purchases and purchases due to the pester power of children. The latter is why British supermarkets were pressured to stop displaying confectionery by the checkout. I limit my impulse buying and chocolate intake by never buying anything from the checkout display. Not hard, as I prefer to buy Fairtrade, organic chocolate, which also limits my consumption.

14:41 Oct 14, 2017 



you're right in pointing this out in my headline (sometimes a quick finger doesn't touch a key properly and one doesn't realize it), but as it was correctly copied into the text showing the context, most people didn't really err...

KudoZ home » English » Food & Drink

difference between countline and table

English translation: Origin of term: countline sold by count/number/unit v tablet sold by weight

14:28 Oct 14, 2017 



the difference between "countline" and "tableT" - the asker erred in writing the term to be consulted and apparently you are perpetuating the error

the difference is

12:50 Oct 14, 2017 



in how it's presented on the shelf.

All chocolate is sold wholesale in more or less big boxes, the difference between "countline" and "table" is in what is offered as a "unit" sold retail - is the retail price for just one "table", or does the retail packaging contain several individually wrapped pieces of chocolate. In UK occasionally you can find retail packs" of say 5 x 100gr tablets sold retail, or 5 x 200gr, or even more.

16:10 Oct 13, 2017 



[PDF]Case No COMP/M.5644 - KRAFT FOODS / CADBURY - European ...
ec.europa.eu/competition/mergers/cases/decisions/m5644_20100106_20212_en.pdf
Jan 6, 2010 - Tablets are chocolate blocks of more than 59g, which usually have a traditional rectangular or square shape and are moulded so as to enable ...

13:00 Oct 13, 2017 



that's what I was talking about. I knew the dict. definitions, but not about the last one, and not about the source of the HU opinion: http://ec.europa.eu/competition/mergers/cases/decisions/m564...

Now, I suspect there is a still undecided definition debate internationally between what seems to be a European and an American definition, as I think my client is more American than British. I haven't ever encountered such as contradictory situation as this...

12:40 Oct 13, 2017 



I hadn't checked before, but after checking I get the impression that IN GENERAL, countline is another word for chocolate bar:
https://www.collinsdictionary.com/de/worterbuch/englisch/cou...
and
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/countline
but some go further:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/countline
and then there is:
https://www.talkingretail.com/products-news/confectionery/fe...

11:47 Oct 13, 2017 



Thank you all very much for the educating contribution to this matter, it has been very useful. Now on another perspective.

On the same question on the EN-HU forum, a colleague has just posted the following:

Tablets
are chocolate blocks of more than 59g, whic
h usually have a traditional rectangular or
square shape and are moulded so as to enable
the block to be broken into regularly shaped
bite size pieces. Some are filled with nuts and ra
isins. They are made of different types of
chocolate such as milk, dark and white.
16.
Countlines
are individually-wrapped bars with filling ingredients which are then usually
completely covered with chocolate coating or
a bar of solid chocolate which has the same
rectangular shape as a typical countline. Countlines are usually eaten as a personal snack

Unfortuantely, she hasn't posted the source, but she has posted addresses with photos, where this kind of difference is marked. I'm not a great fan of Google and photo collections, so I'm rather interested if anyone here could corroborate that this text of explanation is also fully valid. Thank you.

11:06 Oct 13, 2017 



because I do not know the US-American market well. As far as I know, consumers there like multi-packs (judging by what I read in the papers and see on TV, some consumers there go for large quantities - and it shows ...). As far as chocolate bars are concerned (the situation for tablets is different), here in Austria you frequently find single bars at the cash point, but multi-packs of all sorts of bars on the shelf. I confess: since I am struggling to keep my weight down, I (single, no family) don't buy multi-packs (I don't even know whether they are cheaper) but I now and then I buy a single bar at the cash point (if I only have a single bar at home, I won't eat more than this single bar). I can well imagine that mothers with children make different decisions.
I assume that the single bar at the cash point attracts a different type of customer (mainly (but ont only) young adults who buy their lunch/snack at the supermarket in a hurry) than the pack of 10 bars on the shelf (mothers of xxx children).

10:48 Oct 13, 2017 



I like chocolate too, but what has that bit of hype got to do with the question? (Remember to limit your sugar intake and brush your teeth after indulging.)

10:46 Oct 13, 2017 



These packs are generally presented as though they are offering a discount on the price of individual bars of chocolate. This is often not the case and may be a form of deception (as I have noticed in my local supermarket with a well-known brand of paper tissues). It is unusual for multi-bar packs to contain more than three or four bars of chocolate and they are less frequently used for the more upmarket brands.

10:41 Oct 13, 2017 



With all of its natural and health-promoting components (like flavonoids, polyphenols and flavanols), dark chocolate is an antioxidant powerhouse and a superfood that's truly a joy to eat. It's been shown to boost heart and brain health, along with fight disease — just some of the many benefits of dark chocolate.Dec 25, 2016
7 Awesome Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate - Dr. Axe
https://draxe.com/benefits-of-dark-chocolate/

10:26 Oct 13, 2017 



I think the difference is more than just the physical location. The marketing would also be different for a considered purchase versus an impulse purchase. For the countline you might stress the value aspects whereas for the impulse purchase you would more stress the "coolness" of the item. [Always bearing in mind that this is junk food and neither good value nor "cool"!]

10:17 Oct 13, 2017 



I understand, but in the countries I've lived in I haven't ever seen such chocolate bar packages. I understand the point, but why is it enough to say the "market is different"? The text is not about the differences between the isle and the checkout point, but about the countline and tablet business. Is it possible that I don't see the point because there are countries where there is a market for countlines and ones where such a market simply doesn't exist? If that's the case behind my lack of understanding, I'm wondering how I'll be able to put it into my target L ... hopefully, someone there will also be able to have an idea about that. But thank you very much for your contribution.

10:10 Oct 13, 2017 



In the supermarket, the multi-bar packs are on the aisle, the individual bars are next to the checkout. The multi-packs represent a conscious decision to buy (perhaps you are going to put one in your child's lunch box each day) whereas the individual packs are more of a spontaneous purchase (that's why they put them by the checkout where you have to stop moving and you are bored). Similarly, a newsagent or tobacconist would sell individual bars but probably not multi-packs.

Automatic update in 00:


4 hrs   confidence: peer agreement (net): +5

Origin of term: countline sold by count/number/unit v tablet sold by weight



Explanation:
The market definition of a chocolate countline is a product that is sold by count rather than weight (like moulded bars), — a chocolate product that is bought "for me now."
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=qCZOAAAAYAAJ&dq="countli...

In the 1980s Cadbury (the predecessor of Cadbury Trebor Bassett) developed a new production process which could extrude chocolate into different shapes and textures without the use of moulds which was used to manufacture a new impulse ‘countline’ snack product. Countline is the name given to chocolate bars originally sold by number in units rather than by weight. In 2006 the overall countline market was worth around £850m (Cadbury promotional literature, 2006). The new product brief was to develop a product that would ‘build on Cadbury’s Dairy Milk heritage in a pure chocolate countline format, exploring all possible textures, configurations and resultant “eats”’ (Cadbury, 1991).
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=lqN-AgAAQBAJ&pg=PT396&lp...

• Countlines: chocolate-covered bars designed to be eaten as a snack and on the go. This includes bitesize countlines sold in multipacks. This category has an extremely wide range of brands, with many available in different sizes or multipacks to address each of the areas of consumer needs, from hunger satisfaction to indulgence. Manufacturers are constantly developing new varieties. This market segment is dominated by “Kit Kat” and “Mars” bars. Products marketed as biscuits or cookies are not included in this category;
• Tablets: solid chocolate bars, blocks or tablets shaped by pouring melted chocolate into moulds, with or without added ingredients;
http://s3.amazonaws.com/zanran_storage/www.icco.org/ContentP...

26.2 Confectionery types
26.2.1 Moulded chocolate tablets and bars
26.2.2 Chocolate countlines
The “countline” is the core of the large-scale chocolate business in many countries. It is typically an enrobed irregular shaped product in contrast to the uniform shape of a tablet. Flow wrap packaging formats dominate the countline market.
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=o1A_DgAAQBAJ&pg=PT980&lp...

The three basic categories are:
(i) Chocolate bars (which may or may not be filled). The typical product is a standard bar of say, Cadbury's or Hershey's.
(ii) Countlines (so called because they are normally sold in single units, that is, by "count" as are chocolate bars, but involve a mixture of chocolate with other ingredients). The quintessential countline is the Mars bar, but the category covers a broad range of items including light products such as chocolate-covered wafers of the Kit-Kat type.
(iii) Assortments
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=HfxcCO5msgwC&pg=PA267&dq...



Alison MacG
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:13
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thank you and all for your help! I do miss a clear reaction to the definitions I quoted in the debate section though, which is somewhat contradictory to this.
Notes to answerer
Asker: This is very interesting, thank you.


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3 hrs   confidence: peer agreement (net): -1

Quality vs Quantity



Explanation:
Quality "healthy" sweets than quantity.

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Note added at 11 hrs (2017-10-13 21:14:56 GMT)
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https://books.google.ro/books?id=GCWsAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA106&lpg=P...

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Note added at 11 hrs (2017-10-13 21:15:30 GMT)
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https://books.google.ro/books?id=GCWsAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA106&lpg=P...

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Note added at 11 hrs (2017-10-13 21:17:59 GMT)
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Apologies for such a big link..

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Note added at 18 hrs (2017-10-14 04:27:40 GMT)
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For Gallagy: She share the link in a few parts. Important thing is that our collegue Peter resolve the problem.

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Note added at 18 hrs (2017-10-14 04:32:25 GMT)
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Google it: Consumer Behavior Analysis: (A) Rational Approach to Consumer Choice
editat de Donald A. Hantula,Victoria K. Wells
Very important to know exactly what are you search for to find an answer..

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Note added at 18 hrs (2017-10-14 04:55:40 GMT)
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If not, Google search for key words: countline and table chocolate


    Reference: http://https://books.google.ro/books?id=HfxcCO5msgwC&pg=PA26...
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, Christine, but your source is unavailable and your solution contradicts all other available solutions and meanings, provide here too, sorry.


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Changes made by editors
Oct 15, 2017 - Changes made by Peter Simon:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/1725400">Peter Simon's</a> old entry - "difference between countline and table" » "Origin of term: countline sold by count/number/unit v tablet sold by weight"

One of the key means for companies to extend their products beyond the typical distribution or product development agreement is to push existing brands into new food categories.

Of the various confectionery players, Mars has spearheaded this policy, setting a precedent that has been avidly followed by companies such as Nestlé and Cadbury Schweppes.

The benefit of extending known brand names into other markets is twofold. In the first instance, it builds brand awareness, making the confectionery product more likely to be the subject of an impulse purchase.

Secondly, use of known brands is a higher guarantee for the success of the new product, where a totally new brand might fail.

Moreover, manufacturers have realised that confectionery brands are increasingly under competition from snack bars and individually packaged cakes and biscuits, as well as impulse ice creams in hot weather. They are therefore keen to enter and profit from these sectors, which are also less mature and saturated compared to confectionery.

Increased competition from snack pack biscuits

Snack biscuit packs are increasingly being positioned against chocolate countlines (or chocolate bars), bagged selflines/softlines in particular, and confectionery in general. Mini-biscuit packs are also gaining in popularity, with United Biscuits launching a range of its biscuits in this format over the course of 2001-2002, as well as Mini Oreo “bites” launched in the US in 2000 by Kraft Foods, and Mini Keebler Cookies (Kellogg Co) in 2001. This format specifically competes against bagged selflines/softlines.

While individually wrapped biscuits in multipacks have long been a key competitive lunchbox item versus countline multipacks, the number of wrapped single- or double-pack biscuits is on the increase in highly developed markets such as the UK.

According to the latest research by global market analyst, Euromonitor International, Western Europe as a whole is the largest region for sweet biscuits both in value and volume. Value sales in 2003 reached US$11.8 billion and accounted for over one-third of global value sales. Sweet biscuits in this region is benefiting from a perception among consumers that biscuit-based products are somehow healthier than pure confectionery products. For example, in Italy some people regard a chocolate covered biscuit as being a more balanced snack than a chocolate bar.

Nestlé, Lindt and Mars move into biscuits

Nestlé and Lindt are among the top confectionery players, which are trying to blur the distinction between chocolate and biscuits by launching biscuit products of their own. For example, Nestlé has recently sought to expand its Smarties brand, giving it a boost by launching Smarties cookies. Ferrero also launched its first non-chocolate-based snack under the Kinder brand in the form of Kinder Happy Hippo in 2002. This is made up of a hippo-shaped wafer shell which is filled with hazelnut and milk cream.

Another product which has come onto the market, competing in sweet biscuits but leveraging well-known confectionery brands is Mars’s Bisc& range. This product is available in four varieties: Bisc& Mars, Bisc& Twix, Bisc& M&M’s and Bisc& Bounty.

According to Euromonitor research, in the US, the appeal of single-portion biscuits is somewhat limited. They are most commonly found in convenience stores, where they are sold for immediate consumption. Branding in this segment is typically weak, and the product somewhat commodified. Nonetheless, one regional trait of note in the US is the popularity of sandwich biscuits in the Southeast. A typical offering might include peanut butter, cheese, or both. These products are available as multipack products in southeastern supermarkets, but also enjoy a substantial following in convenience store channels, as individually wrapped products. The Lance brand (Lance Inc) is among the leaders in this segment. This format is also increasingly popular in Japan

Mars leads the way with ice cream

At the forefront of confectionery brand extensions, Mars’s ice cream portfolio mirrors that of confectionery, with Mars, Galaxy/Dove, Snickers, Bounty and Twix all commonly found in the ice cream cabinet, as well as sugar brand Starburst. Furthermore, in 2002 the company extended Maltesers into impulse ice cream.

This policy has also offered Mars significant potential economies of scale, particularly in relation to advertising and promotional investment. There is a major emphasis on encouraging impulse purchase, which ideally suits the promotion of the Mars range, although 2001 witnessed a shift in focus with the launch of several bulk brands, most notably Mars and Bounty.

Cadbury has also extended many of its confectionery products such as Flake, Bourneville, Crunchie and Refreshers into impulse ice cream. Nestlé, on the other hand, which has been aggressively developing its overall ice cream business, has been slower at promoting its confectionery brands, although KitKat does appear in an impulse ice cream format.

Cake bars and chilled desserts get into the act

Mars has also teamed up with United Biscuits in the UK to develop its Galaxy and Milky Way brands into individually wrapped cake brands, while Cadbury Schweppes offers its Fudge brand as a cake, and builds on the equity of the Dairy Milk brand for its Mini-Rolls. Ferrero also uses the Kinder brand in cakes.

Nestlé, on the other hand, prefers brand extension into chilled desserts, making use of its substantial dairy expertise. This is one of the few sectors where Nestlé piped Mars to the post in terms of product development, having launched Milkybar and Rolo desserts long before Mars’s tie-up with Eden Vale to develop Galaxy, Milky Way and Bounty.

Snack bars compete on health grounds…

Snack bars typically compete with chocolate countlines (chocolate bars) by positioning themselves as a tasty, but healthy alternative. This is the case across all sectors including granola bars, which focus on health and naturalness; energy bars, which focus on functionality; and breakfast bars, which play on the link with breakfast cereals. This is also the case with other snack bars, including sesame seed bars in Eastern Europe, and fruit bars in the UK and the US.

Even though snack bars are increasingly covered in sugar and chocolate in order to make them tastier, the inclusion of wheat flakes, nuts and other cereal ingredients contributes to their healthier image. Conversely, bar the specialist slimming or sports products, these bars are no longer viewed as too “saintly” to be enjoyed as a snack.

…and as meal replacements

Euromonitor reports that the healthy growth of breakfast bars has highlighted trends in developed markets of eating on the go or at the desk at work, often skipping a proper breakfast and lunch and stocking up on snacks instead. Once the province of countlines, biscuits or savoury snacks, cereal manufacturers have launched a range of breakfast bars carrying the branding of their most popular cereals such as Special K, or promoting a range of bars specifically for people too busy to stop and eat breakfast, such as Nutri-Grain (both Kellogg Co).

While these bars somewhat limit themselves by targeting a particular mealtime/time of the day for consumption, manufacturers such as Cadbury clearly think this is a good way to boost sales, having launched a “Brunch Bar”.

Although still small, sales are forecast to see healthy growth over the forecast period, with energy bars particularly set to benefit from health and wellness trends.

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